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Christmas Culture Grief Holidays Photography

She Can’t Swallow

“She has suffered a severe stroke and can no longer swallow.”

Can’t swallow? I thought. Gave the notion some time, and considered such a disability and its awfulness. Suction tubes. Dependence. Embarrassment.

Can’t swallow anymore.

I don’t believe I know this person, for she is a facebook friend of a friend sort of thing, but I was stricken when I read of her.

Here it is the Christmas season. We’re planning and cooking and wrapping gifts and hanging twinkle lights. We drink untitled (28 of 34)eggnog and write on cards and wait in line at the post office to buy stamps whose style we have selected from a poster the clerk  indicated, and that way we get to decide whether to buy Santa Claus or the baby Jesus or something in between.

We writers do the writerly things of edits and proposals and agent chasing and dreams of bestseller lists and the scribbling of another draft and wrestling with fears of rejection, or an even untitled (34 of 34)worse agitation, perhaps, when we think of the resounding thump of no response, for have they not said on their site, “If you haven’t heard in 4 to 6 weeks, consider . . . ”

We photographers talk of light and settings and film and digits and lenses and focus and software and how much post-processing is okay.

And well we should do these things for life must continue.

Yet, someone has said, “She had a severe stroke and cannot swallow.

And so I say a prayer and my heart aches.

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America Christianity/Religion Church Courage Life Medical/Technical Pentecostal The World video

Nona Freeman Following Her Stroke

She’s an amazing woman of God: on this video, mere days following her recent stroke, from her hospital bed, Sister Freeman speaks.

God bless her and keep her.

Nona Freeman, veteran missionary to Africa, is one of the best-loved writers in Pentecost. Nona and her husband, E. L. Freeman, began their life of missions in 1948 in South Africa. They left the United States with their five children ranging in ages from nine years to six months. They spent the next forty-one years in Africa, returning to the states on furlough every seven, six or five years. Even after her husband’s death in 1999, at the age of ninety, she continues to travel, preach and speak. She has served the Lord in ministry for seventy years

Remarks taken from her website

December 9, 2009 IMPORTANT UPDATE on Sister Freeman here. She is now under Hospice care.