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It’s Obama Time!

There are two kinds of presidents; foxes and hedgehogs. President Obama appears to be a fox. So says Allan Lichtman, a political history professor at American University.

“Foxes know a little about everything. They have their fingers in every pie. … Hedgehogs only know a few things and know it well and leave the details to others. Clinton was a classic fox. Bush was a classic hedgehog.”

And Obama? He appears to be a fox, too, Lichtman said.

What called forth this anaylsis–this interesting comparing of hedgehogs and foxes? The answer lies with President Obama’s often being late to important meetings.

WASHINGTON — There’s a new time zone in the nation’s capital: Obama Time.

Barely two weeks into his presidency, Barack Obama has made a clean break from George W. Bush in several high-profile moves, including reversing a number of the 43rd president’s policies.

He’s also reversed an unwritten but much-noticed Bush policy: Be on time, all the time.

Obama has been routinely late to events and news conferences, including the ones at which he reversed Bush’s orders. This has led to an already familiar refrain from the Obama camp: “He’s running late.”

The president was nearly 30 minutes late Wednesday for the ceremony at which he signed a bill to expand children’s health care. He was 10 minutes late Thursday to a memo signing at the Energy Department.

Even before the inauguration, Obama wasn’t a punctual sort; he arrived late to a Jan. 8 news conference on the economy that was aired live by broadcast and cable networks.

“To me, being tardy, it’s got to be one of two things,” said presidential historian Doug Wead, who advised both Bush and his father, George H.W. Bush. “Bad organization that can be corrected, or it’s arrogance. It sounds to me like this is arrogance.”

Mark Lindsay, a Democratic consultant and former senior White House adviser to Bill Clinton, disagreed, explaining that Clinton was late sometimes because he was making accommodations for logistics or average citizens.

“I would make the opposite observation,” Lindsay said. “I would say that taking time to accommodate your schedule to regular citizens is not an act of arrogance. It’s an act of humility.”

Allan Lichtman, a political history professor at American University, had a different explanation for Clinton’s tardiness.

“President Clinton was always late because he wasn’t very disciplined in general,” he said. “This was a man who marched to the beat of his own drummer, who liked to talk, liked intellectual discussions, had his finger in every pie.”

Source: Stephen Clark Fox News

What do you think? Does it matter whether or not we are late for appointments? Is consistently being late a type of arrogance? Have you had problems with tardiness? Did you overcome it? How?