Challenge to Republicans and to Christians

Similarities exist between political parties and church denominations: A close look at that knowledge might serve as a magnifying glass to assess the effectiveness of either organism.(Hang with me, here. Need to lay some groundwork 🙂 )

Since the election, much discussion has centered around the future of the Republican party, with some predicting its demise, while others say we just need to regroup and reignite ourselves. There seems to be no dispute that not only have the demographics in America changed, but the social conventions and mores are distinctly different from those of 50 years ago–or either 20 years ago for that matter. So, then, if the Republican party is to survive as a conservative body and if we hope to ever again elect a president, should we not change our stance? Should we not accommodate those who want to legalize abortions, those who want to say that marriage no longer needs to be between one man and one woman, those who want increased government involvement in our lives . . . and on and on? You know the issues.

Similar challenges face the church. If we are to grow then, should we not accommodate revised values and declining morals? Should we not lower our standards so as to entice people to fill our auditoriums–to vote for us, if you will?

I say no. We should not change. Never. (Don’t get silly on me here. I’m not talking about refusing to use cars, computers, telephones, or airplanes. I’m speaking to changes in morality, modesty, and integrity.)  If we do change, the Republican party will be gone, morphed into something else: If we do change, our church “denomination” will be gone, morphed into something else. The answer? We must help people understand our beliefs and our value system. We must somehow find a way to let them know the advantage there is in living upright, with Judeo/Christian principles in place.

Within the book I finished writing a couple of weeks ago, the protagonist, Abram, speaks to a church board where he has been called to account for his frank preaching:

“Truth is the great examiner.” Every eye was directed to Abram as he continued. “Truth is the inquisitor that recognizes no rank, and that considers neither race, gender, age, nor intent in its expose. Truth advances into a hospital room and announces a grim report, or laughs with another who tells of dodging the cancer. Truth points a finger at David and declares, ‘Thou art the man.’” Silence roared in the fine room.

Abram returned to his assigned place. He stood, as he continued, his voice softer now as he appealed to his colleagues. “Brethren, let us remind ourselves that of he who markets in truth is demanded the highest accountability.

So, those of us who call ourselves Christian and those of us who call ourselves Republican, let us examine ourselves and our principles. Let us be sure of them. Then let us find effective ways to present our message as being truth and the hope of the world.

One thought on “Challenge to Republicans and to Christians

  1. Greg The Explorer

    Shirley, I knew before I read this that I would agree with your every word…not because you and I have similar politics or theologies, we don’t, but I knew you would be talking about integrity and honour…both of which are so sadly missing in this world. You are so right, if you believe what you offer the works is best for it, then changing what you offer is not on the table…it can’t be, changing the delivery is necessary…not the message.

    Blessings to you and your family.

    Greg, your words are important to me for they precisely mirror what I intended this piece to project. You know how it is–not always sure we are understood.

    I am 74 years old, and to this day, I analyze my beliefs–want to be sure I have it right. Paul addressed the subject with the church at Philippi when he said, “…work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.” Quite a powerful admonition, but then our salvation is rather significant–wouldn’t you say?

    Always enjoy talking with you.

    Peace and joy…..

    Like

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