Hmm…Is it Twenty-Ten or Two-Thousand Ten?

Great issues of the world: Do you say twenty-ten, or two-thousand ten? Why? Some people have definite thoughts as to which is correct and have written concerning their opinions. Others take issue with there being any absolutes in the matter.

How say you? I have no preference, really, but in thinking about which I more often use, I note that I usually say two- thousand ten. Actually I kind of like the sound of twenty-ten better, and it is one syllable shorter, so using that term would save me a bit of time. 🙂

Two other questions to which I could easily find the answer, but won’t at the moment: 1. Should the words in question always be capitalized? 2. Where do the hyphens correctly belong?

15 thoughts on “Hmm…Is it Twenty-Ten or Two-Thousand Ten?

  1. Off subject: I consider Oreos the finest commercially created cookie in the world–well in any world I have experienced.

    Take a fistful of crunchy black Oreos, oozing with just the right amount of white creamy goop (don’t like double-stuffed). Set down on cabinet. Reach for large, clear glass. Fill with ice. Take bottle of 2% from the refrigerator. Fill the glass with the icy milk. Eat. Drink…be merry. 🙂

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  2. Jay???? What are you saying to me here? We were like brothers, and now you disagree with my older and wiser version of how to say 2010??? You better break out a bag of oreos so we can have a Lick-Off over this!

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  3. A time of frivolity is a welcome distraction from otherwise mind and spirit jarring news from elsewhere in the world – good of you Shirley to be prepared to post something a bit light on.

    I said nineteen such and such, but then said two thousand and such and such and have been saying two thousand and 10 – but I kind of like the sound of twenty ten – makes it seem like a little bot of a short hand coed – and I’m somehow cool for having used it!

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  4. Isn’t this an earth-shaking conversation we have going on here. There must be those around the world just hanging onto our every thought in order to decide how they will speak of our year.

    Helps to lighten up sometimes, doesn’t it. We are so blessed to be able to have a frivolous moment during these dark days. I know the horrendous conditions in Haiti are on all our minds. Sometimes I look at those pictures for awhile, then I just have to stop. Cannot bear to see any more. God help them, and bless them, and keep safe those who are taking aid to that impoverished and damaged country.

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  5. Shirley,

    I find my self waffling a bit here. When I am talking about something in the 19xx I tend to say, back in nineteen-ninetynine. However if it is something that happened in 20xx I tend to say two thousand-one.

    I don’t believe I have ever said Twenty – zero -one, or twenty – oh-two. So for that reason I think you can put me in the two thousand -ten crowd.

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  6. According to a page found on the Penn State website, “Fundamentally, the hyphen is a joiner.” This site has some quick tips about when or when not to use hyphens. It can be found here: https://www.e-education.psu.edu/styleforstudents/c2_p2.html

    While searching for capitalization rules, I did not come across your exact conundrum. However, I would think that it would be better served to italicize the word in question. Use of italicizing was prevalent in the sites I visited. The word(s) that were being discussed (in question) for clarification of capitalization where italicized.

    It seems that it is more common for people to capitalize a word when they want to add extra “weight” or emphasis to it’s meaning. This too was evident in my search for the answer to your thought provoking questions! Thanks for making me spend a little extra time on grammar today!

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  7. Cynde

    Well… the best argument I’ve heard in favor of saying “twenty ten” is that we used to say “nineteen whatever”. So I’ve chosen to stick with twenty ten. But let me know if you resolve the matter of punctuation. <:)

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