The Little Red Hen and Free Bread

The little red hen called all of her liberal neighbors together and
said, ‘If we plant this wheat, we shall have bread to eat. Who will
help me plant it?’

‘Not I,’ said the cow.

‘Not I,’ said the duck.

‘Not I,’ said the pig.

‘Not I,’ said the goose.

‘Then I will do it by myself,’ said the little red hen, and so she
did.   The wheat grew very tall and ripened into golden grain.

‘Who will help me reap my wheat?’ asked the little red hen.

‘Not I,’ said the duck.

‘Out of my classification,’ said the pig.

‘I’d lose my seniority,’ said the cow.

‘I’d lose my unemployment compensation,’ said the goose.

‘Then I will do it by myself,’ said the little red hen, and so she did.

At last it came time to bake the bread.   ‘Who will help me bake the
bread?’ asked the little red hen.

‘That would be overtime for me,’ said the cow.

‘I’d lose my welfare benefits,’ said the duck.

‘I’m a dropout and never learned how,’ said the pig.

‘If I’m to be the only helper, that’s discrimination,’ said the goose.

‘Then I will do it by myself,’ said the little red hen.

She baked five loaves and held them up for all of her neighbors to
see.  They wanted some and, imagesin fact, demanded a share. But the little
red hen said, ‘No, I shall eat all five loaves.’

‘Excess profits!’ cried the Pelosi cow.

‘Capitalist leech!’ screamed the Boxer duck.

‘I demand equal rights!’ yelled the Jackson goose.

The Kennedy pig just grunted in disdain.

And they all painted ‘Unfair!’ picket signs and marched around and
around the little red hen, shouting obscenities.

Then the leftist farmer came. He said to the little red hen, ‘You
must not be so greedy.’

‘But I earned the bread,’ said the little red hen.
‘Exactly,’ said the farmer. ‘That is what makes our free enterprise
system so wonderful. Anyone in the barnyard can earn as much as he
wants. But under our modern government regulations, the productive
workers must divide the fruits of their labor with those who are lazy
and idle.’

And they all lived happily ever after, including the little red hen
who smiled and clucked, ‘I am grateful, for now I truly understand.’

But her neighbors became quite disappointed in her. She never again
baked bread because she joined the ‘party’ and got her bread free. And
all the liberals smiled.  Fairness and compassionate equality had been
established.  Individual initiative had died, but nobody noticed;
perhaps no one cared…so long as there was free bread that ‘the rich’
were paying for.

Author unknown 🙂

Came my way via the cutting-edge internet, so it must be true, wouldn’t you say.

7 thoughts on “The Little Red Hen and Free Bread

  1. Hello, Susan. Welcome to my blog. Hope you’re here at lot.

    I suspect we probably are more in agreement than in disagreement. Our little children should not suffer from the lack of health care (and most of them do not), nor should persons who are physically unable to care for themselves be medically neglected (and most of them are not.) I can tell you are a caring person, as are most people of our wonderful country. I applaud your love for your fellow man.

    And our Jesus! What an example and model for us–no disagreement there. I taught that beautiful lesson in my Sunday school class yesterday. I took donuts in to illustrate the story, after which the youngsters ate the donuts. After class we shared our food with everyone else in the church, serving the donut pieces on yellow napkins and offering tiny cups of water. We’re collecting a beautiful box of food to give to a family in our neighborhood who is more needy than we are. Yes Jesus is our greatest example. How I love Him and the lessons He gave us.

    Be blessed today and always.

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  2. Susan

    Wasn’t it Jesus who fed the multitude with the loaves and the fishes. What a liberal he was!No one should expect to be taken care of without working, except for children and the elderly. Suffer the little children to come unto me, He said. But we make the little children suffer in our society without health care or free child care for the poor. We do make the children suffer, but that’s NOT WJWD (What Jesus Would Do). You see Jesus was not a capitalist; he put the moneychangers out of the temple. He was a humanitarian, among other things.

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  3. I understand this hen; in fact if I look closely I believe I see a faint hue of red along my skin, and if I rub just right, I may feel the close nub of a feather.

    For nearly all my adult life, I have worked without pay, except for the intrinsic and eternal rewards I have received–and the others I expect in the future–of which there is no equal. But practically speaking, and earthly speaking, for any work I have done, the dollars placed into my hands have been sparse. (Except for when I speak at meetings, and then I am paid far more than I deserve, and abundantly more than I can possibly be worth.)

    I’d like to have a try at being rich. 🙂 Just being honest, for I think it would be delightful, and while I understand I can’t truly “know” myself, I believe I could handle the challenges that come with such a position, and that my windfall would be used to bless others in my world.

    However, both in my coveted (and purely imaginative) rich place, and in my actual modest state, I want to decide to whom I will give my bread. While I certainly believe in paying my fair share of taxes for certain of my benefits–police, military, highway construction and such–I definitely do not believe it should be within the realm of the government to tell me to whom–or if at all–I give my loaves of bread. I planted the seed, rose early to harvest the wheat, mixed the dough, and baked my bread. I’ll no doubt share with a lot of people, but please, don’t you presume to tell me I must give any of it away.

    Anybody have butter?

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