The Flag on the 5th

Every year after Christmas in newspapers around the globe are pictures of deserted Christmas tree lots,  and residential shots of trees stripped of their glitter and dragged to curbside, where, forlornly, they await pickup by the local garbage truck. Oh, there may remain a whisper of glory–a flutter of tinsel or a hint of angel hair–but the precious ornaments have been boxed, the sparkling lights are disconnected, and the music boxes have been silenced. The Christmas tree is spent.

“Nothing more useless than a Christmas tree the day after Christmas,”  someone has said.

Not so with the flag. Not so with the Red, White and Blue. Not so with the Stars and Stripes–the banner, the ensign–of the United States of America. Not so with that cherished piece of cloth that in itself has negligible value, but that becomes a storied tale of honor when pristine strength and gallant endurance  is woven betwixt its threads.

Today, the 5th of July, within our enduring banner reposes all honor that reflected there at yesterday’s dawn and at dusk of evening. For our prized flag, today, the 5th of July,  there is no place in the mud of gutter or in the decay of trash heap.

Today, the 5th of July, that amazing signal beats in the wind–an agent of hope and equity and freedom. Today, the 5th of July, with absolute assurance, flies the symbol of the greatest country on the planet. No stripping of agency, no negating of authority, no cowardice, no subjugation. 

Today, the 5th of July, the day after our birthday celebration, where, across the land, we pull out all stops; where we march parades and mount long and loud speeches and grill our finest meats and launch our hottest firecrackers–today, the 5th of July, there is no cessation of flag waving, no poverty of spirit, no paucity of patriotism. The flag lives, the flag waves. There is none like it.

There is no place on earth like the United States of America, just no place. On this, the 5th of July, there are yet people who love this country and who willingly offer their lives for its hallowed truths.

Navy Seal Mikey Monsoor was one such gallant young man.

The flag is safe. The flag endures.

The voice of President Bush breaks with emotion as he awards posthumously the Medal of Honor to Mr. Mikey Monsoor.

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My devotional blog is here.

11 thoughts on “The Flag on the 5th

  1. Jolene, never be ashamed of patriotism to our beloved country. Never be ashamed to speak with honor of both our God and of those men and women who have given themselves for the United States of America.

    Always retain your clear understanding that it is through precious freedom that we are able to worship God in our own ways. Multiplied millions, although they love God, are not free to worship openly…because of the lack of a country that extends such liberty…because of the “lack of such flag” if you will.

    Thomas Sowell has written beautifully on the subject :

    The Fourth of July is a patriotic holiday but patriotism has long been viewed with suspicion or disdain by many of the intelligentsia. As far back as 1793, prominent British writer William Godwin called patriotism “high-sounding nonsense.”

    Internationalism has long been a competitor with patriotism, especially among the intelligentsia. H.G. Wells advocated replacing the idea of duty to one’s country with “the idea of cosmopolitan duty.”

    Perhaps nowhere was patriotism so downplayed or deplored than among intellectuals in the Western democracies in the two decades after the horrors of the First World War, fought under various nations’ banners of patriotism.

    More of this timely article here.

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  2. Oh silly goofy me, AP, to actually love Christmas more than the 4th of July. To put the Lord above the nations, including my own. How foolish to keep a nativity before my eyes. What an agenda. Oh, how I misconstrue.

    The post began with a discarded Christmas tree. Get Christmas over! Oh how bad is my goofy, silly agenda that I would keep Christmas all year.

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  3. I thank God for the men and women who give so unselfishly for the Freedom of this country. I thank God for Calvary for that is where my sins where nailed to the cross and my soul was set Free.

    The Flag will always hold a special place in my heart for it represents my Freedom to Worship my God, my Freedom of Speech and Etc. The Cross will always hold a special place in my heart (even though I know He is no longer there) because it represents my Freedom from sin because that is where my Salvation was bought with His precious blood.

    May we never forget the men and women who gave their lives for the Freedom of our Country. May we never forget the Flag and what it stands for. May we never forget the cost at the Cross. May we never forget our GOD.

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  4. Pingback: strength and honor

  5. AP

    Helen,
    It amazes me how time after time you can misconstrue a beautiful post to propogate your goofy agendas.
    SJB,
    Thank you for another great post.
    AP

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  6. The birth of Jesus in the closet and the birth of the nation on the flagpole. My do we have it wrong.

    As for me I will put the red, white and blue back in the closet to make room for the manger.

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  7. Good morning, Brenda–

    Such courage amazes me and causes me to question whether or not I am that brave. Whenever I read about the Seals, I think of Jim Ghiloni.

    This morning, give him a big hug and thank him again–for me–for his service to our wonderful USA.

    Love —

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  8. Brenda G

    How very touching to see such unselfishness!
    When I met my husband, he was a Navy Seal, serving in UDT Team 11. The training and harsh rigors that these men go through is unbelievable.
    The stories he tells, especially when he gets together with his frogman buddies, John Wolfram and Tom Bracken are amazing. We do have such dedicated men serving in our armed forces. May God Bless America!! and as Jim would say, “Hooyah!”

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